Skip to Main Content

Stages 1 to 2

Symptoms by Stages

The following is a reprint of information compiled and created by the Foundation for IgA Nephropathy (a form of kidney disease), which is featured on their website.

Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1 to 2 – Early chronic renal insufficiency

  • Physical symptoms. Usually few or no physical symptoms that you can feel (other than those you may experience if you have heavy proteinuria).
  • Blood work. Blood work results will show abnormalities – mainly a slightly elevated serum creatinine. Note that there is often a time lag between elevations of serum creatinine, and some progression of the IgAN. By the time serum creatinine is elevated, the person may already have lost 50% of kidney function.
  • Urinalysis. Urine will show abnormalities. Urine can be checked by dipstick in the doctor’s office (as an initial check), and followed up with a more complete urinalysis. The main urine abnormality that will suggest a kidney disease is the presence of protein and/or blood. Either will usually trigger further investigation. However, blood and/or protein in the urine don’t say anything about actual kidney function.
  • Treatment. Treatment may involve some mild dietary changes (a lower protein diet may in some cases be recommended), and a blood pressure medication may be prescribed (usually of the ACE inhibitor class, the angiotensin II receptor class, or both, even if blood pressure is not really elevated much).
  • Blood pressure. Some people start having high blood pressure even in early chronic renal failure. IgAN is one kidney disease that can do this.
  • Anemia. Anemia may rarely occur at this stage. In this case, it is most often caused by having heavy proteinuria rather than actual chronic renal insufficiency.

Print or emailPrint or Email